Poland

Cycling in Poland is popular despite poor rankings of cycling infrastructure, insecurity on our roads and many other problems that respondents complain about, such as frequent thefts of bikes. Car drivers commonly exceed speed and still not enough streets exist where traffic is calm or zones with speed limit of 30 km/h. In addition, cycling roads are still missing, and those existing, are often occupied by parked cars or serve pedestrians.

However, from year to year, we observe an increase in the number of cyclists in Poland. 70% of Poles ride bicycles, including: systematically 22%, from time to time 35%, and 13% only occasionally (CBOS 2012).

The popularity of two wheels is growing, so the authorities – both national and local – are trying to adopt Polish law and infrastructure to standards known from cycling European countries. This is also triggered by new challenges such as a growing number of conflicts between pedestrians and bikers. More and more Polish cities are beginning to run a comprehensive cycling policies.

One of the elements of such policies is an investment in public bicycles. With public bicycle systems operating in Poland since 2009, the number of trips meanwhile is impressive. Only in May 2018, Veturilo bikes in Warsaw were used 1 030 332 times. Public bicycles certainly contributed to the increase not only of cycling itself but also the awareness of local governments, residents and most importantly – drivers who prove that the bike is a full-fledged means of communication in the city. The observation shows that urban bike systems in cities in which they have been implemented, although the infrastructure is not sufficient, fulfill the basic goal, which is supplementing public transport – but also help to get on with educational tasks (safety). Above all, however, such an investment is an impulse to build bicycle infrastructure. It is worth noting that where the cycling roads grow consistently more focus can be observed on non-linear cycling infrastructure.

Poland
City of Warsaw
Foundation Earth and People

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